Identity Management

Organizations struggle to vet identities and approve access requests because the data resides in various locations and business units. Requesters often encounter roadblocks when seeking access, leading them to escalate requests to upper management and override the proper vetting process. Furthermore, those tasked with approving requests lack sufficient insight into which employees require access to confidential data.

The lack of a centralized, authoritative identity repository for users makes reconciliation another significant challenge. Additional problems arise when privileges on systems either exceed or lack access levels that were previously granted and provisioned.

When it comes to certification and accreditation, examiners may have insufficient knowledge of access needs. Not to mention, processes tend to be manual, cumbersome and inconsistent between business units. This task becomes even more difficult when examiners must conduct multiple, redundant and granular validations.

Provisioning and deprovisioning identities can pose a critical challenge when manual provisioning processes are ineffective. Organizations that fail to remove improper IAM privileges or resort to cloning access profiles will face similar struggles.
Failure to segregate duties and monitor administrators, power users and temporary access privileges can further impede enforcement. Other issues include lack of support for centralized access management solutions, such as directories and single sign-on, outdated or nonexistent access management policies, and failure to establish rule-based access.

Finally, compliance concerns arise when performance metrics do not exist and/or do not align with security requirements, such as removing identities and access privileges automatically upon an employee’s termination. Laborious and time-consuming audits only make this problem worse.